The Conservative Intellectual Tradition in America

Session 3: The Conservative Tradition and the American Experiment

Conservative Intellectual Tradition in America banner

Guest Lecturer: Speaker Newton Leroy "Newt" Gingrich

Themes: Competing accounts of the major political ideas surrounding the American Revolution in light of conservative principles; the continuity of the Anglo-American political tradition.


Recorded: 2/1/2012

Required Reading:

Dickinson, John. Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania, V & IX

Carey, George. “How Conservatives and Liberals View The Federalist,Arguing Conservatism

Bradford, M.E. “How to Read the Declaration: Reconsidering the Kendall Thesis”

Kesler, Charles. “Higher Law and Original Intent: The Challenge for Conservatism,” Arguing Conservatism

Jaffa, Harry V. “The False Prophets of American Conservatism”

Kirk, Russell. “A Revolution not Made but Prevented”

Henrie, Mark.Russell Kirk’s Unfounded America, Arguing Conservatism (p. 244-249).

Stoner, James. “Is There a Political Philosophy in the Declaration of Independence?”

 

Recommended Reading:

Adams, John. “A Dissertation on the Canon and Feudal Law,” in David Hollinger and Charles Capper, The American Intellectual Tradition: Volume I – 1630 to 1865

Heineman, Robert. “Edmund Burke and the American Nation”

Kirk, Russell. “Edmund Burke and the Constitution”

Kirk, Russell. “John Adams and Liberty under Law,” The Conservative Mind

Madison, James. The Federalist, “Number 10” and “Number 51,” in David Hollinger and Charles Capper, The American Intellectual Tradition: Volume I – 1630 to 1865

Shain, Barry. “Oversights, Leaps, and Confusions”

Warren, Mercy Otis. Selection, History of the Rise, Progress, and Termination of the American Revolution, in David Hollinger and Charles Capper, The American Intellectual Tradition: Volume I – 1630 to 1865

Schneider, Gregory L., ed., Conservatism in American since 1930. New York: New York University Press, 2003.

Murray, John Courtney. We Hold These Truths. Rowman & Littlefield, 1960, 2005. See especially the introduction by Peter Augustine Lawler.

Course Overview

Section One: Introduction
Section Two: The Foundations of American Conservatism
Section Three: The 20th Century and the Recovery of a Conservative Tradition
Section Four: Conservative Triumph, Consensus, and Crisis